BassWestUSA - May/June 2009, Page 36

Jeremy Anderson and Grant Olguin started Black Dog Baits two and a half years ago. The two friends thought they might have some fun, sell a few lures, and make some extra cash. But what started with a couple of homegrown, hand painted wooden baits quickly expanded into a full time business that has them busy keeping up with orders, traveling to industry shows, and entertaining manufacturing bigwigs.

one thing to mess around with lures in your tackle box, carve your own plug, or pour the odd worm or two. But it takes a special kind of crazy (not to mention drive and talent) to take that passion and turn it into a successful business. There’s a lot of competition, and a lot of potential pitfalls. But in just a couple of short years, and against the odds, Black Dog Baits has established itself as a major player. Jeremy Anderson and Grant Olguin started Black Dog Baits two and a half years ago. The two friends thought they might have some fun, sell a few lures, and make some extra cash. But what started with a couple of homegrown, hand painted wooden baits quickly expanded into a full time business that has them busy keeping up with orders, traveling to industry shows, and entertaining manufacturing bigwigs. Jeremy and Grant met each other when they both worked for UPS. They would commute to work together in Jeremy’s truck, his beloved black lab Bo between them. A friendship sprung up over fishing, both having grown up fishing Northern California waters, and they shared an interest in mak- ing and modifying baits. Interests sparked by a bait making contest with his father as a teenager, Jeremy taught himself how to paint custom baits with an airbrush, and soon gained a reputation through word of mouth in the angler community as the go-to guy for custom paintwork. Grant also toyed with bait making, even sell- ing a few in stores, but neither of them considered it more than a hobby until they decided to form Black Dog Baits. Somewhat surprisingly, although they were avid bass anglers, they were not swimbait guys from the get-go. Grant admits Jeremy was the first to take to big bait fishing. Jeremy describes himself as hav- ing been a “pretty traditional fisherman,” armed

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May/June 2009